Programmes

The Other Side of Formal Employment: Working Women Who Have Returned to Their Communities and Villages in Sri Lanka

DURATION

2015 — 2017

LOCALE

Colombo, Galle, Gampaha, Kalutara, Kandy,

Kurunegala, Monaragla, Rathnapura (Sri Lanka)

DONOR

Edith Cowan University,Australia

Department of ForeignAffairs and Trade, Australian Government

OBSERVATIONS/RESULTS

This three-year study that concluded in 2017 was undertaken to assess the long-term outcomes and achievements of a cohort of women working in the formal sector.


The study found that factory work had empowered women. They had gained technical skills, social bargaining skills, the ability to navigate or confront corporate processes, build networks, access greater decision-making powers in the family and the community, acquire financial security, and also by adopting the strategy of working untilthey become eligible to obtain statutory benefits.


The findings of the study were disseminated through policy level stakeholder meetings and the wide circulation of the final report and the policy documents that were published in the two local languages and English.

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The Other Side of Formal Employment: Working Women Who Have Returned to Their Communities and Villages in Sri Lanka

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